Creative Writing Courses

Creative Writing I (Course 659)

Grade 9

2 Credits                                                                                                         

Full Year

This course introduces freshmen writers to the art and process of creative writing. Students will read, write, and experiment in three major genres of writing: poetry, non-fiction, and fiction. This class will begin learning the essential operating principles of the Creative Writing Department: reading to write, utilizing form, the power of language, and the habits of successful writers. Through various workshops and writing exercises, students will expand their knowledge of literary process, literary elements, and literary influences. Students are required to submit original work for publication as determined by the course instructor.

 

Creative Writing II (Course 660)

Grade 10

2 Credits                                                                                                        

Full Year

Prerequisite: Completion of Creative Writing I

Building on the successes of the students’ first year in Creative Writing, this course increases their focus, endurance, and depth. Students will endeavor to expand their cultural literacy by learning and writing about wide-ranging topics (such as philosophy, psychology, science, technology, politics, culture, the arts, relationships) through the lens of Intellectualism. Through various workshops and writing exercises, students will continue to expand their knowledge of literary process, literary elements, and literary influences. With a more intense focus on analysis and revision than Creative Writing 1, students will engage with and compose their own contemporary works of fiction, nonfiction, poetry, and playwriting. Students are required to submit original work for publication as determined by the course instructor.

 

Writing Elective Non-Fiction: Coop Publishing House (Course 669)

Grades 11-12                                                                                                                                 

1 Credit                                                                                                         

Semester

Students will participate in the operation of Coop Publishing House (CPH)–a working publishing house. CPH is responsible for the ongoing production of Coop’s school newspaper (www.coopvoices.com) and annual literary magazine (Metamorphosis), as well as a variety of student written and edited books. To date, two full-length book collections, as well as smaller books, have been published. Students serve as professional writers and editors–creating their own work and soliciting, collecting, editing, publishing, and promoting the work of the many writers and artists in the Co-op Community. CPH students have been inspired by roundtable discussions with notable writers and publishers, including Barry Jay Kaplan, Paul Bass, Melinda Tuhus, Mark Oppenheimer and Laura Pappano, as well as by field trips to local places and events of interest such as The Beinecke Rare Book & Manuscript Library, New Haven Reads, Occupy New Haven, The Grove, and the Downtown Farmers Market. Students will complete a portfolio-quality Capstone project and are required to submit original work for publication as determined by the course instructor.

NOTE: Due to the variation in content and form each semester, students who have successfully completed one section of this course may take another section with teacher approval.

 

Writing Poetry Elective: Authentic Voice (Course 663)

Grades 11-12

1 Credit                                                                                                         

Semester

Authentic poetry is poetry that no one but you could have written because no one else is you. This course offers an in-depth study of the technical elements of poetry that create the individualized poet’s voice. Emphasis will be placed on metaphor, image, rhythm, sound, and the use of figurative and sensory language. Students will study the works of historically significant poets (Walt Whitman, Emily Dickinson, Langston Hughes, etc.) and contemporary poets from Tupac to Jamaal May.

Seniors who choose to do their Capstone during this class session will receive appropriate support from the instructor. Students are required to submit original work for publication as determined by the course instructor.

 

Writing Elective Fiction: Writing the Short Story (Course 665)

Grades 11-12

1 Credit                                                                                                         

Semester

Prerequisite: Successful Completion of Courses 659 and 660

Writing the Short Story is an opportunity to focus on writing and refining short fiction pieces with the intent of submitting our work to various contests and magazines.  To that end, students will be focused on crafting their stories with a specific audience and purpose in mind.  A great deal of attention will be paid to character and conflict development as well as the mechanics of writing.  Students are expected to write new material each week, as well as read the assigned materials. Through various workshops and writing exercises, students will expand their knowledge of literary process, literary elements, and literary influences.

Seniors who choose to do their Capstone during this class session will receive appropriate support from the instructor.

 

Writing Elective Non-Fiction: Coop’s Publishing House (Course 669)                   

Grade 11-12

1 Credit                                                                                                         

Semester

Prerequisite: Successful Completion of Courses 659 and 660   

Students will participate in the operation of Coop Publishing House (CPH)–a working publishing house. CPH is responsible for the ongoing production of Coop’s school newspaper (www.coopvoices.com) and annual literary magazine (Metamorphosis), as well as a variety of student written and edited books. To date, two full-length book collections, as well as smaller books, have been published. Students serve as professional writers and editors–creating their own work and soliciting, collecting, editing, publishing, and promoting the work of the many writers and artists in the Co-op Community. CPH students have been inspired by roundtable discussions with notable writers and publishers, including Barry Jay Kaplan, Paul Bass, Melinda Tuhus, Mark Oppenheimer and Laura Pappano, as well as by field trips to local places and events of interest such as The Beinecke Rare Book & Manuscript Library, New Haven Reads, Occupy New Haven, The Grove, and the Downtown Farmers Market. Students will complete a portfolio-quality Capstone project and are required to submit original work for publication as determined by the course instructor.

NOTE: Due to the variation in content and form each semester, students who have successfully completed one section of this course may take another section with teacher approval.

 

Writing Elective Fiction: Playwriting and Screenwriting (Course 667)              

Grade 11/12

1 Credit                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                Semester                                                                                                                          

Prerequisite: Successful Completion of Creative Writing I and II

Psychology of Storytelling is an opportunity to focus on writing and refining short fiction pieces with the intent of ultimately sending something out for publication.  To that end, students will be focused on crafting their stories with the intent of reaching a specific audience and/or achieve a specific purpose.  A great deal of attention will be paid to understanding character and conflict development as well as the mechanics of writing.  Students are expected to write new material each week, as well as read the assigned materials. Through various workshops and writing exercises, students will expand their knowledge of literary process, literary elements, and literary influences.

Seniors who choose to do their Capstone during this class session will receive appropriate support from the instructor.

 

Poetry Writing Elective: The Poetic Time Machine (Course 671)

Grade 11-12                                                                                                                    

1 Credit                                                                                                             

Semester

Prerequisite: Successful Completion of Creative Writing I and II   

Seniors who choose to do their Capstone during this class session will receive appropriate support from the instructor.

This course focuses on 20th-century American poetry from Walt Whitman through the Harlem Renaissance, the Modernists, Beats Poets, and to the Contemporary Spoken Word Movement. Writing includes creative and critical assignments inspired by or based on the writers and poetic movements studied. Through workshops and weekly writing assignments students will write authentic original contemporary poetry influenced by the time and movement being studied. Students will also learn and become facile with basic and advanced poetic elements.

Seniors who choose to do their Capstone during this class session will receive appropriate support from the instructor. Students are required to submit original work for publication as determined by the course instructor.