Arts Electives

These courses are open to any student from any arts concentration with the permission of the instructor (with the exception of Directing). Please note that these courses are cross listed with their Departments.

American History through Film (Course 378)                         

Grades 11-12

.5 Credit                                                                                                        

Semester

Prerequisite: 12th graders – passing grades in Civics and US History I 

11th graders – passing grade in US History I

Note: Elective courses are offered based on teacher availability and student need. This class may not be taught some years.

American History through Film is a college-level seminar course in which students examine historical figures, memorable events, political movements, and notable atrocities throughout the course of United States and world history. Each student must produce an analytical critique of each movie. Students are responsible for their own research with supervision and assistance from the instructor.  Papers are based on topics in the films and on primary and secondary sources.

 

Composition/Arranging (Course 762)                                        

Grades 11-12

1 Credit                                                                                                          

Full Year

Prerequisite:  Teacher Recommendation

Using the notation software, Sibelius7, and the audio production software, Logic Pro 9, this class will introduce students to the current electronic techniques involved in musical composition and arranging.  Musical projects will range from simple two-part harmonization, arranging and composition to complex, multi-part music.  The course will cover a variety of commercial musical genres including: pop songs, SATB choir scores, commercial radio/TV jingles, infomercials and film scores.  As the course progresses, the projects will become increasingly complex and will begin to reflect the unique talents and artistic direction of each student.

 

Recording Arts (Course 793)                                                                                             

Grades 11- 12

1 Credit                                                                                                           

Full Year

Do you love music? Do you have music in your head but just don’t know how to perform it? Would you like to learn more about music and how you can write your own? This hands-on course for beginning through advanced musicians is a step-by-step approach on how to create, record and save music with a computer using software such as Garageband and Logic Pro 9. This class is will utilize synthesizers and computers to create musical compositions. More advanced music composition techniques will be explored as well as piano keyboard skills and music theory.

 

Technical Theatre Elective (Course 1005)

Grades 11-12

1 Credit                                                                                                        

Semester

Prerequisite: Theater Arts juniors and seniors. Students will be accepted into the class based on an application and interview process.

This class may serve as either an art or technology credit. The maximum number of students in this class will be 12.

In this course students will learn about the fundamentals of Stagecraft and will develop the technical skills necessary to serve successfully as running crew members for Co-op productions and live events. Students will participate in a series of studio assignments and production work calls that relate directly to Co-op’s busy Main Stage production calendar. Safety, theater etiquette and collaboration will be emphasized.

 

Social Justice Theatre (Course 1036)

Grades  9-12

1 Credit                                                                                                         

Semester

Please Note: This course is open to students from every Art Concentration, no theater experience is required.

This course seeks to provide students with a basic understanding of how theatre can be used to examine historical and current events and to highlight injustices that happen in society.  Students will learn how to create an ensemble by participating in various theater exercises and also to understand that constructive collaboration with their peers is the key to becoming a global citizen.  Throughout this course, students should expect to participate in challenging class discussions, theatre games, writing exercises, song, dance, and art that will enhance visibility of what has happened/ is happening/ and what could happen in this world when people are silenced or given a voice.  Students apply acting and analytical skills, create characters, memorize lines, and work in an ensemble to create an original performance for public presentation.

 

Directing for the Stage (Course 780)

Grades 11- 12

1 Credit                                                                                                          

Semester

Prerequisite: Theater Arts juniors and seniors. Students will be accepted into the class based on an application and interview process.

This class may serve as an art credit. The maximum number of students in this class will be 20.

An introduction to play direction, including: script analysis and research methods, preparation of production book, consideration of design elements, casting, rehearsal techniques and work with actors. All students should expect to complete a Directing Portfolio that includes research, design elements, casting, and a script with annotations for a given play.  All students will direct at least two scenes that will serve as the midterm and final for the course.

 

Exploration in Visual Design Elective (Course 1035)              

Grades 9-12

.5 Credit                                                                                                         

Semester

This is a one-semester course that introduces students to the elements and principles of design, using a wide range of mediums and techniques. Students will explore various artists and art periods to provide inspiration and ideas for their own work.  Each assignment will focus on a specific artist, art period or element and principle of design. This course is open to students from any arts concentration.

 

Dance for Non-Majors: (Course 779)

Grade 11 and 12 

.5 Credit                                                                                                        

Semester

Non-dance students will have the opportunity to learn basic concepts of dance in various styles of dance. The class will explore movement using elements of dance through improvisation and experimentation. This class will allow students that do not have previous dance experience explore, respond and create.

 

Facing History and Ourselves (Course 370)    

Recommended Grade 12

0.5 credit                                                                                                       

Half Year

Note: All elective courses are offered based on teacher availability and student need.  As a result, this class may not be taught in some years.

Facing History and Ourselves is a citizenship education program that examines racism, anti-Semitism, and other forms of prejudice via the study of history. The course is inquiry-based, student-centered, and interactive. In the first semester, students study life in Germany in the 1920s and 1930s to answer essential questions about human behavior. In the second semester, genocide in Armenia, Rwanda, and the Darfur region of Sudan; apartheid in South Africa; and the Eugenics movement in America are studied through written narratives, literature, film, simulations, and trials. Essential questions force students to grapple with moral and ethical dilemmas, including, “How could the Nazis and Adolf Hitler come to power? What did average people do in everyday life to allow these events to take place? How could things have been different?” By studying the years leading up to and including the atrocities, learners make real-life connections to their own decision-making today. Questions such as “What do we do in our everyday lives that allows discrimination and inequality to continue? How are we responsible as citizens in a democracy? How can our own actions and attitudes change the world?” serve to frame the course.